Help SupportFord Raptor Forum by donating:


Help support Ford Raptor Forum :

Whipple's 6.2L 650hp Raptor system

Discussion in 'Whipple Superchargers' started by Whipple Charged, Feb 3, 2012.

  1. rbarn

    rbarn Full Access Member

    Posts:
    192
    Likes Received:
    49
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    Thats not correct MTF. Engine will not overheat. The thermostat is there to restrict flow to ensure it does heat up and the engine gets to operating temp. Otherwise it would never warm up.

    you are correct that you can out flow the HE's ability to shed the excess heat. Thats why you run a double pass HE (check) and put shrouded fans on it. (check) The fluid stays in the HE twice as long and has constant even airflow through it whether the vehicle is moving or not.

    It's a balancing act for sure. Bigger is better as long as everything is bigger together. There is such a thing as overkill too, lol
     
  2. MTF

    MTF FRF Addict

    Posts:
    3,625
    Likes Received:
    906
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2010
    Location:
    NYC
    See I knew this would turn into a little battle. We are both right the thermostat serves both functions.
    I will find the text book on the descrpytion of a thermostat this is not the first time I've had this argument, in my life time.

    And yes I agree with you, someone would have play with it to see what the best scenario would be!


    I found one guy that states what I'm trying to say.
    I really do not want to flood this forum any more about this.

    Peace!!! :happy160:


    Thermostat
    The thermostat is simply a valve that measures the temperature of the coolant and, if it is hot enough, opens to allow the coolant to flow through the radiator. If the coolant is not hot enough, the flow to the radiator is blocked and fluid is directed to a bypass system that allows the coolant to return directly back to the engine. The bypass system allows the coolant to keep moving through the engine to balance the temperature and avoid hot spots. Because flow to the radiator is blocked, the engine will reach operating temperature sooner and, on a cold day, will allow the heater to begin supplying hot air to the interior more quickly.
    [​IMG]Since the 1970s, thermostats have been calibrated to keep the temperature of the coolant above 192 to 195 degrees. Prior to that, 180 degree thermostats were the norm. It was found that if the engine is allowed to run at these hotter temperatures, emissions are reduced, moisture condensation inside the engine is quickly burned off extending engine life, and combustion is more complete which improves fuel economy.
    The heart of a thermostat is a sealed copper cup that contains wax and a metal pellet. As the thermostat heats up, the hot wax expands, pushing a piston against spring pressure to open the valve and allow coolant to circulate.
    The thermostat is usually located in the front, top part of the engine in a water outlet housing that also serves as the connection point for the upper radiator hose. The thermostat housing attaches to the engine, usually with two bolts and a gasket to seal it against leaks. The gasket is usually made of a heavy paper or a rubber O ring is used. In some applications, there is no gasket or rubber seal. Instead, a thin bead of special silicone sealer is squeezed from a tube to form a seal.
    There is a mistaken belief by some people that if they remove the thermostat, they will be able to solve hard to find overheating problems. This couldn't be further from the truth. Removing the thermostat will allow uncontrolled circulation of the coolant throughout the system. It is possible for the coolant to move so fast, that it will not be properly cooled as it races through the radiator, so the engine can run even hotter than before under certain conditions. Other times, the engine will never reach its operating temperature. On computer controlled vehicles, the computer monitors engine temperatures and regulates fuel usage based on that temperature. If the engine never reaches operating temperatures, fuel economy and performance will suffer considerably.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2012
    axel likes this.
  3. fordfan

    fordfan Full Access Member

    Age:
    43
    Posts:
    166
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Location:
    Kane PA
    From talking to whipple right now they do not offer any upgrades. They made the larger inter cooler standard and the heat exchanger is in the works. They also are using a little smaller injector ow which I'd different from the first kits that were out. I am very interested in the news heat exchanger they are testing but want numbers on actual IATs before I'd buy it. They tell me they are a month or two away from having the LT tune released as well. I hope it comes out by spring so I can run there tune vs going custom. Whipple has there shit together IMO and pretty sure that when they release a tune it will be bad ass!!! I have done a lot of performance work over the years and a dyno tune is by far the best way to get max benefit out of ur mods but it is only as good as the guy running the dyno and writing the tune. I have a guy close to me that I would not let tune a golf cart!!!
     
  4. MTF

    MTF FRF Addict

    Posts:
    3,625
    Likes Received:
    906
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2010
    Location:
    NYC
    Yup, they went from 63 to 47 lbs. Since I'm sticking to stock exhaust I will keep my 63s until told otherwise.
    If you're going to be driving on open country roads you will be fine with the standard heat exchanger,
    if a mix of open road and city, I advise the upgraded one. If you do drive a lot of city I would and I'm going with the new one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2012
  5. fordfan

    fordfan Full Access Member

    Age:
    43
    Posts:
    166
    Likes Received:
    28
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Location:
    Kane PA
    Right now I do not have an option to buy a upgrade of any kind, depending on test results I will possibly upgrade at a later date

    ---------- Post added at 02:50 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:44 PM ----------

    Right now I do not have an option to buy a upgrade of any kind, depending on test results I will possibly upgrade at a later date
     
  6. rbarn

    rbarn Full Access Member

    Posts:
    192
    Likes Received:
    49
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    Got my ebay HE in today. Appears to be about the same size as the stock Whipple HE, but a little thicker. Stock HE is single pass, this one is double pass.

    If you want to upgrade the HE now to what Whipple says they have coming out "soon" (lol) then you can buy an Afco or C&R double pass GT500 upgrade HE. They run about $700-800 with fans or $400-500 without.

    Adding a couple of $15 small 7" ebay fans to the stock Whipple cooler should be plenty of "upgrade" in cooling for most of us.
     
  7. axel

    axel Member

    Posts:
    44
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Location:
    cc tex
    That blue is the business. I am still in the air on roush or whipple, arh long tubes w/offroad "no cat" y pipe showed up today. Have my own custom airaid intake, def. getting a twinscrew, just worried bout tuning issues, . Maybe whipple needs a 2012 scab to do some tests with?
     
  8. axel

    axel Member

    Posts:
    44
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Location:
    cc tex
    yessir on the tsco
     
  9. Cubdriver

    Cubdriver Full Access Member

    Posts:
    85
    Likes Received:
    18
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2010
    Location:
    Anchorage, Alaska
    FYI my truck ran 461rwhp on a Dyno jet with the standard Whipple tune. I am going to run meth injection and 10lbs soon as I get some time, also plan on running some long tubes.

    Will let you guys know as soon as I have time to play with it.

    Hank
     

Share This Page