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Octane Matters

Discussion in 'Ford F-150 Raptor General Discussions [GEN 2]' started by Jason Snokhous, Oct 8, 2019.

  1. Medic 6

    Medic 6 Member

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    Run 91 in mine, unable to find 93 in southern PA or central MD.
     
  2. goblues38

    goblues38 Full Access Member

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    I think the sweet spot for 93 is Ohio to Kansas
     
  3. misuracaf10

    misuracaf10 Full Access Member

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    Don’t even get us started on cheap oil then and oil change intervals ...

    No matter what grade I try to use a good label fuel and every oil change put in a bottle of redline fuel system cleaner the best of the best


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  4. raptorbone

    raptorbone Member

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    Modern flex fuel engines come with wide-band O2 sensors. This allows the PCM to detect an inferred octane or ethanol mix and adjust parameters accordingly. When adding 91 or 93 octane over 87, you have given the engine additional knock resistance and so the PCM will advance the timing and/or increase boost giving you more power. This is exactly what a tuner also does to your truck. Modern engines also have knock sensors that will cause the PCM to advance timing even further if it does not measure knock under specific load conditions. If it does measure knock, it will retard timing to protect the engine.

    Cars without wide-band O2 sensors will not make more power with premium fuel.

    I only run 93 octane in my Gen1 with a 93 tune. Much more power than on 87. I also have a RCSB with the coyote 5.0 pushIng 900 hp (750 to the wheels). I only run E85 with an octane rating of approx. 105. And now my garage smells like corn and the drag strip. Love it.

    I find it hard to conceive you'll spend $70k on a truck and you don't give it the best quality fuel. Or even care about fuel costs. Buy a Hyundai. On boosted applications, low quality fuel can lead to knock, knock leads to detonation, detonation leads to calling AAA. Spend the $0.60 per gallon extra, protect your ride and enjoy the extra power.
     
  5. melvimbe

    melvimbe Full Access Member

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    Your calculation is a bit off. Your 1.22 gallon number (21.6/ 17.6) isn't accurate as your essentially counting the benefit of 93 octane twice. Perhaps you were trying to say that 36 gallons of 93 gets you 634 miles. You'd need 37.27 gallons (634/17.0) to get the same number of miles. Close to your 1.22, bot not the same. I'm guessing you came up with .48 by dividing .6/1.22, but I don't know why.

    I looked at this way...
    93: 12,000 miles/year @ 17.6 MPG = 681 gallons. At a price of $3.00/gal, that's $2045.


    87: 12,000 miles/year @ 17.0 MPG = 706 gallons. At a price of $2.40/gal, that's $1700

    or around $350 difference. As the price of gas goes up, the value of higher octane will also go up if it goes up by the same flat amount. As price goes down, lower octane is a better value.

    But, the stats also said the MPG were at 75mph. While I may like to drive at 75mph all the time, I can't. I don't know what the MPG gain would be at lower speeds, but it's probably safe to say the MPG gain is less signifcant. I also average around 15k miles a year, so it's probably going to cost closer to $500 a year


    But 87 octane isn't wrong. I understand and appreciate point out the gains of higher octane, but that doesn't justify the cost to everyone. The way I see it, chosing to go 87 octane isn't that different from choosing not to get a tune, an intercooler, or all the other things you can chose to do beyond stock. All have performance gains and all make sense to do for some people,


    The last part is something to consider. Are you equating cheap gas with octane?
     
  6. isis

    isis Member

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    If you’re dynoing in 2wd the normal parasitic losses are closer to 15% fwiw. 20-25 is more like awd/4wd losses. And as someone else said, it’s more of a Ax+y equation than a straight percentage. There’s some fixed losses (inertia) and some percentage (friction) of the power going to the ground. It’s all pretty inexact but that’s the fun of internet dyno racing.

    I run 93 in mine. A tank lasts me 4-6 weeks with my short commute so f-it.
     
  7. Jason Snokhous

    Jason Snokhous Member

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    Here is the full write up on the 3.5.

    BF0ABE15-026A-428F-8B63-2173D137315D.jpeg

    9F731C10-D976-4C67-984E-4B25523B97C5.jpeg
     
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  8. GCATX

    GCATX Full Access Member

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    The most shocking aspect of this thread is that someone actually bought a magazine. :^)
     
  9. Jason Snokhous

    Jason Snokhous Member

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    Ha! I bought a year subscription on Amazon for cheap.
     
  10. dan cox

    dan cox Member

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    My dealer told me 87 and I think they filled it with that. Still waiting to get empty from dealer gas to try 93! Excited to see if there is a difference. Only have 300 miles on the truck right now. Wanna be completely empty before filling.
     

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