ARB Twin Air Compressor Install

Adrenlin

Active Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2021
Posts
66
Reaction score
101
Location
NC
I just installed an ARB Twin Air Compressor into the bed of my 2022 Raptor. As this will be used to reinflate tires, I'm using just the twin compressor unit and didn't opt for the optional external tank. This is the walkthrough of my installation. Since I can only add 5 photos to a post, I'll be splitting this walkthrough up.

Here's what I ordered.

Builtright Bedside Rack System 4 Panel Kit F-150/Raptor 2021+
ARB Twin Compressor (ARB CKMTA12)
ARB Pump Up Kit (ARB 171302)
ARB Tire Pressure Inflator/Deflator (ARB 605A)

Even though I ordered, and installed, all four Builtright panels, only one of the panels for the front side of the bed was used for the compressor. So that's all you really need to mount the compressor. The two front panels are the same, regardless of the side of the truck. The bigger rear panels near the tailgate are specific to the left and right sides, in the event you want them as well.

The first steps are to attach the compressor mounting plate. There are 8 stainless steel hex head bolts that hold the compressor to the bracket. Remove the bolts and separate the bracket from the compressor so you can attach the bracket to the Builtright panel.

I used the supplied hardware with the ARB kit, but added couple of large washers on the backside of Builtright panel since their bolts screw into the mounting plate. I just used some spare washers I had lying around. The exact size doesn’t matter, you just need something that is large enough that you can't pull them through the Builtright panel. Even though there are eight bolt holes on the bracket, only four of them will line up with the Builtright panel. ARB only supplies four bolts anyway. I also took the time to drill a couple of holes into the mounting plate to access the lower bolts that attach the Builtright panel to the bed using the Ford BoxLink system. Otherwise you can't secure the Builtright panel with the ARB bracket in the way. See Figure 1.

The next step was to reattach the compressor to the bracket. I found it easier to remove the compressor cover to replace the two stainless steel inside bolts for the lower side of the compressor. See Figure 2. These are some of the bolts that were removed when the bracket and the compressor were separated earlier. I didn't use the two upper middle bolts, as I simply couldn't access them with the bed cover rails in the way. Six out of eight bolts should easily suffice to hold the compressor to the mounting plate though.

Once the compressor is mounted, reinstall the compressor cover , and thread on the air filters. I also used this time to go ahead and screw in the air hose fitting. You can use a relocation kit, but I chose to mount this straight onto the compressor. See Figure 3 and Figure 4.


continued below....
 

Attachments

  • Parts.jpg
    Parts.jpg
    268 KB · Views: 186
  • Figure1.jpg
    Figure1.jpg
    346.8 KB · Views: 194
  • Figure2.jpg
    Figure2.jpg
    364.6 KB · Views: 186
  • Figure3.jpg
    Figure3.jpg
    286 KB · Views: 182
  • Figure4.jpg
    Figure4.jpg
    221.1 KB · Views: 181
OP
OP
Adrenlin

Adrenlin

Active Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2021
Posts
66
Reaction score
101
Location
NC
The wiring diagram that comes with the unit can seem a little daunting at first, but it isn't that bad if you're just wiring this up to inflate tires, like I planned on doing. Additional wiring is available for air lockers and additional switches, and wouldn't be used in my scenario.

Focus on the main harness first. It's the larger plug. There are two red wires, and two black wires. The red wires are the same size, and the two black wires are different gauges. I had to extend the harness to reach the front of the Raptor. Use 10 gauge wire for the red wires, and 8 gauge for the heavier black one. The smaller black wire appeared to be 16 gauge. You can always use a heavier gauge (numerically lower) wire, but never use a lighter gauge wire to extend a line. When extending the harness, you'll want the fuses close to the battery. So I cut the fuse blocks from the harness, leaving some extra wire to facilitate tying them back in later. Since you will be extending the wires, snip any connectors off to make the next step easier as well.

You'll need to drill a hole in the drain plug, and pass the wires through so you can access them from the underside of the truck. On bed covers such as the Undercover Armor Flex I have installed, this is not really different than running drain tubes through the drain plugs. You can see this in Figure 5.

Once the large harness is through the drain plug, focus on the smaller harness, this is the control harness. This harness has two wires, one purple and one black, at the plug that connects to the ARB compressor. These are the only two wires I used for my configuration. One the other end of the harness there's also a green and yellow wire. You'll also find green, black, and yellow connections in the middle of the harness as well. I snipped all of these off, for my application as these are used for additional switches and air locker solenoids. I've modified an image of the wiring diagram from the manual, in hopes of better illustrating what is, and isn't used, on the harness.

I mentioned that I only used the purple and the black wire. The black wire is the ground wire, and the purple line is the switched power that toggles the compressor on/off. The purple wire should be tied into one of your Raptor's upfitter switches. In my case, this was upfiiter #6. Since this is just a signal wire, current is minimal. So I used one of the switches with the smallest amperage rating. This leaves the higher amerage switches free for other accessories.

Once the smaller harness is through the drain plug as well, extend your harnesses and begin the task of getting the harnesses to the front of the truck. I used some 14 gauge wire I already had on had to extend the smaller harness. You'll be running a total of six wires to the front of the truck. Two red, three black, and one purple. I fished my wiring along the inside of the frame rail.

Once you get close to the front, you'll find a grounding strap that connects the body to the frame. I utilized both ends of this strap for grounding. I crimped a connector onto the 8 gauge line and used the factory bolt to clamp it down at the frame end of the strap. The other two ground wires were tied together and secured at the other end of the strap. I used wiring loom and zip ties to secure and protect the wiring. See Figure 6.


continued below....
 

Attachments

  • Wiring.jpg
    Wiring.jpg
    76.5 KB · Views: 135
  • Figure5.jpg
    Figure5.jpg
    289.5 KB · Views: 134
  • Figure6.jpg
    Figure6.jpg
    205.7 KB · Views: 133
OP
OP
Adrenlin

Adrenlin

Active Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2021
Posts
66
Reaction score
101
Location
NC
I continued the three other wires towards the front bringing them out of the frame rail at the fenderwell. I used wiring loom to protect the wires, and routed them up and into the engine compartment. See Figure 7. Once in the engine compartment, I tied the extended purple wire into the wire for upfitter #6, and connected the fuseblocks back to the two red main power lines for the compressor. Then I disconnected the negative battery terminal, and connected the fuseblocks to the battery reconnecting the battery once I had everything secured.

One other consideration I had was with the clamps that held the bed cover rails in place. Clearance was pretty tight between the Builtright panel and the clamps, even after repositioning the clamps. The clamps wanted to sit at a slight angle, due to the bulge in the side of the bed. So I slightly ground down the back side of the clamps with a belt sander, which allowed them to fit flush. See Figure 9 and Figure 10.

Hopefully this will prove useful to anyone else looking at installing an ARB Compressor. Following the directions, especially in regards to the wiring can be a little daunting upon first glance. However, it's not as complex as it first appears. Simply take your time, and you'll be fine.
 

Attachments

  • Figure7.jpg
    Figure7.jpg
    190.9 KB · Views: 92
  • Figure8.jpg
    Figure8.jpg
    267 KB · Views: 86
  • Figure9.jpg
    Figure9.jpg
    418.4 KB · Views: 88
  • Figure10.jpg
    Figure10.jpg
    257.3 KB · Views: 92

4wheelinAZ

Full Access Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2021
Posts
702
Reaction score
889
Location
AZ
Fantastic write up sir. I’m still in the debate stage on where to put mine. The bed or under the rear seat. Like you, it will only be used for inflating tires. Does the mounting plate come with the ARB or is that purchased separately?
 
OP
OP
Adrenlin

Adrenlin

Active Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2021
Posts
66
Reaction score
101
Location
NC
Fantastic write up sir. I’m still in the debate stage on where to put mine. The bed or under the rear seat. Like you, it will only be used for inflating tires. Does the mounting plate come with the ARB or is that purchased separately?
The mounting plate came with the compressor. Under the rear seat wasn't an option I wanted to consider for a few reasons. First I didn't want to lose any interior storage space. Then there was the noise factor, and the fact that you may want to keep the heat, cold air, rain, or snow, outside the vehicle rather than leaving a door open while inflating the tires.
 

The Car Stereo Company

aka grumpy car stereo guy
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 8, 2012
Posts
29,381
Reaction score
15,478
Location
here, on frf
for that long of a wire run, you may want to change out for 8ga minimum. but i guess time will tell. just check on the compressor at times and make sure heat isnt a factor. it will get hot for sure, but larger gauge wire will reduce heat caused from resistance from a high current dc connection.
 
OP
OP
Adrenlin

Adrenlin

Active Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2021
Posts
66
Reaction score
101
Location
NC
for that long of a wire run, you may want to change out for 8ga minimum. but i guess time will tell. just check on the compressor at times and make sure heat isnt a factor. it will get hot for sure, but larger gauge wire will reduce heat caused from resistance from a high current dc connection.
Thanks. I plan on monitoring it for a while.
 

Kyle761

Active Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2020
Posts
51
Reaction score
50
Location
Huntington Beach
I put mine where the stock jack is. I can’t use the stock jack anyway cause of the 37’s and I got a Hi-lift. I really like the spot because it’s out of the elements and easy to get to.
 

Attachments

  • 3A6AC66F-E358-4E6A-9B7E-F105ABC46692.jpeg
    3A6AC66F-E358-4E6A-9B7E-F105ABC46692.jpeg
    278.5 KB · Views: 133

4wheelinAZ

Full Access Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2021
Posts
702
Reaction score
889
Location
AZ
I put mine where the stock jack is. I can’t use the stock jack anyway cause of the 37’s and I got a Hi-lift. I really like the spot because it’s out of the elements and easy to get to.
Pretty damn sick install man. I thought the stock jack came with a spacer for the 37s? I’ve been researching jack options myself. Hi lifts make me nervous…
 
Top