Gen2 Rear Wheel Locking Up

Disclaimer: Links on this page pointing to Amazon, eBay and other sites may include affiliate code. If you click them and make a purchase, we may earn a small commission.

RiskTkr

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2024
Posts
28
Reaction score
17
Location
Texas
Unfortunately most dealers pencil whip the inspection process, often they don’t even bother to road test the vehicle. They’re more interested in flipping it for a profit they adhering to the Certified Pre-Owned requirements. If the warranty is through Ford Protect and the truck hasn’t been modified, ideally the issue will be covered.
The truck has Eibachs, camburg upper control arms and 37s from the dealer that certified it. I asked them if this affects the warranty and they said no. What are your thoughts?
 

FordTechOne

FRF Addict
Joined
Jul 29, 2019
Posts
6,470
Reaction score
12,651
Location
Detroit
The truck has Eibachs, camburg upper control arms and 37s from the dealer that certified it. I asked them if this affects the warranty and they said no. What are your thoughts?
Sounds like the dealer is unethical to put it nicely. To start, there are extensive road tests that need to be performed before a vehicle can be sold as “Blue” or “Gold” certified. If they had actually done those tests, it they should have found this issue well before selling it to you as “certified”. So red flag #1.

Both Ford “Blue” and “Gold” warranties explicitly state that the vehicle modifications are not covered. The vehicle is also required to have the factory suspension and tire size. Red flag #2.

It sounds like you need to have a conversation with the GM of the dealership, not only for certifying an ineligible vehicle with a warranty that doesn’t apply, but a clear failure on their part to even bother doing the inspection and road test. I can send you the Blue or Gold program requirements so you can reference them when confronting the dealer, just DM me your VIN.
 
Last edited:

CleverGirl_

Cabin Clown
Joined
Jun 23, 2023
Posts
1,933
Reaction score
4,519
Location
843
Sounds like the dealer is unethical to put it nicely. To start, there are extensive road tests that need to be performed before a vehicle can be sold as “Blue” or “Gold” certified. If they had actually done those tests, it they should have found this issue well before selling it to you as “certified”. So red flag #1.

Both Ford “Blue” and “Gold” warranties explicitly state that the vehicle modifications are not covered. The vehicle is also required to have the factory tire size. Red flag #2.

It sounds like you need to have a conversation with the GM of the dealership, not only for certifying an ineligible vehicle with a warranty that doesn’t apply, but a clear failure on their part to even bother doing the inspection and road test. I can send you the Blue or Gold program requirements so you can reference them when confronting the dealer, just DM me your VIN.
+1 Go to the GM of the dealer with this information.
 

RiskTkr

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2024
Posts
28
Reaction score
17
Location
Texas
+1 Go to the GM of the dealer with this information.
Don't even know how I would handle or my point would be. Do I try to get them to put the truck back to stock or are the going to just say "Well I guess the vehicle doesn't get warranty and F off"
 

CleverGirl_

Cabin Clown
Joined
Jun 23, 2023
Posts
1,933
Reaction score
4,519
Location
843
Don't even know how I would handle or my point would be. Do I try to get them to put the truck back to stock or are the going to just say "Well I guess the vehicle doesn't get warranty and F off"
Do you have paperwork you got a warranty?

If they rescind the warranty, and you have proof you bought it with one, lawyer up.

Ive seen people forge signatures on "certified" paperwork so its not all perfect.

They "should" just own up and cover whats broken, and then offer a revised agreement (ill admit i didnt read the whole thread im just here for the warranty BS)
 

RiskTkr

Member
Joined
Feb 17, 2024
Posts
28
Reaction score
17
Location
Texas
Do you have paperwork you got a warranty?

If they rescind the warranty, and you have proof you bought it with one, lawyer up.

Ive seen people forge signatures on "certified" paperwork so its not all perfect.

They "should" just own up and cover whats broken, and then offer a revised agreement (ill admit i didnt read the whole thread im just here for the warranty BS)
I do have the paperwork that clearly says it has warranty and 14 day return policy under 1k miles..... But you cant have a loan on the vehicle... SMH.

I'm just gonna talk to the GM man to man and see if he is willing to help out. If not looks like I'll have to Lawyer up.
 

FordTechOne

FRF Addict
Joined
Jul 29, 2019
Posts
6,470
Reaction score
12,651
Location
Detroit
I do have the paperwork that clearly says it has warranty and 14 day return policy under 1k miles..... But you cant have a loan on the vehicle... SMH.

I'm just gonna talk to the GM man to man and see if he is willing to help out. If not looks like I'll have to Lawyer up.
Just replied to your DM. Not only did they violate the certified pre-owned program requirements due to the modifications, but OASIS lists it as a branded title with all warranty cancelled. That could also explain the problems you’re having.
 

smurfslayer

Be vewwy, vewwy quiet. We’re hunting sasquatch77
Joined
Dec 16, 2016
Posts
16,450
Reaction score
24,320
This is a pretty huge grey area that I think a lot of FRF may be affected by and are blissfully ignorant.

let’s say customer a scores a great deal on a ‘certified’ preowned Rap. Customer finds a tuner hand held in the glove box when they get home and upon further research, learn that the truck has some aftermarket tune on it. Most of us are going to be like “yeah, I hit the jackpot, the work’s already been done for me”. They live contented until some time in the future... when let’s say, their, IDK, transfer case lets loose. The first thing the tech does is check for codes, 2nd thing, see if it’s been tuned. That ends the warranty claim right then and there.

BUT the owner bought with what they thought was an intact powertrain warranty. So now what?
The buyer is 100% not at fault in this scenario, the selling stealership is but that’s a difficult spot to be in and once you pony up for the repair, you will never see that full amount reimbursed on the outside chance that you actually got the stealership to admit their wrongdoing. Ford does explicitly disclaim non factory modifications right up front in their warranty paperwork when you buy the vehicle new and they keep that doc online for subsequent users, just like the owner’s manual.

OASIS lists it as a branded title with all warranty cancelled. That could also explain the problems you’re having.

So with this info, I would return the truck and get your money back at a very minimum.
That’s some really lowdown, dirty behavior right there. You should report this to Ford C/S at a minimum.
 

Oldfart

FRF Addict
Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Posts
5,812
Reaction score
14,071
Location
Saggy Balls Division of Trump Army
Most states, by law, require a dealer to tell you of a reconstructed/branded title. Looks like some scummy bastards at your dealership.

Pennsylvania car dealerships must disclose whether a vehicle being sold is new or used. If used, dealers must also describe the vehicle’s prior usage in a clear and conspicuous manner, especially if it was used by a dealership as a demonstrator vehicle, has been reconstructed, or was used as a corporate fleet vehicle.
 

smurfslayer

Be vewwy, vewwy quiet. We’re hunting sasquatch77
Joined
Dec 16, 2016
Posts
16,450
Reaction score
24,320
Most states, by law, require a dealer to tell you of a reconstructed/branded title. Looks like some scummy bastards at your dealership.

Pennsylvania car dealerships must disclose whether a vehicle being sold is new or used. If used, dealers must also describe the vehicle’s prior usage in a clear and conspicuous manner, especially if it was used by a dealership as a demonstrator vehicle, has been reconstructed, or was used as a corporate fleet vehicle.

I would bet that an enterprising stealership would be able to say something like “How could we have known the previous user tampered with the emissions and powertrain programming, they did not disclose this to us”. Were I a scummy stealership in PA, I’d probably be inclined to interpret this broadly and provide a less precise, more general previous use description to “operated on public roadways” to be compliant. I’m not saying this is ethical, just a way I could see a stealership to exploit the law.

There are two groups of people in the populace who exist because
1) they excel at deception, whether by explicit action, selective use of language or omisison
2) their command of language and manipulative skill make them superior to most other people’s ability to detect deception

They are politicians and vehicle sales men/women.

Even a good and practiced negotiator can fall victim to people who are comfortable manipulating others.
 
Top