3.5 EB spark plug design update ‘22+

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Ox3721

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Came across this video of a Ford tech going through plug replacement procedure on a 2019 truck. At the beginning of the video, he mentions that Ford has changed the spark plugs (and I would assume the heads as well) on 2022+ 3.5 EB engines from a traditional tapered seat plug, to a flat surface, gasketed plug in order to achieve a specific indexing (clocking) of the plugs. He seems intrigued by the change, but doesn’t really explain why Ford decided to do this. From what I understand, this is very unusual, especially in a forced induction application and even more so for consumer vehicles. The last time I remember hearing about indexing plugs was on an Arctic Cat racing snowmobile (2-stroke) back around 2012. Anyone have any idea what might have caused Ford to make this change?

 

djevox

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To me (my own opinion), it sounds like they were trying to eek out max hp numbers. It’s usually worth only a few hp and generally not worth the effort. Must be chasing power or economy numbers.

Edit: One more WAG is that they had a difficult pre-ignition issue that was solved with indexing. Again, probably chasing power or economy numbers.
 

2020FordRaptor

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Came across this video of a Ford tech going through plug replacement procedure on a 2019 truck. At the beginning of the video, he mentions that Ford has changed the spark plugs (and I would assume the heads as well) on 2022+ 3.5 EB engines from a traditional tapered seat plug, to a flat surface, gasketed plug in order to achieve a specific indexing (clocking) of the plugs. He seems intrigued by the change, but doesn’t really explain why Ford decided to do this. From what I understand, this is very unusual, especially in a forced induction application and even more so for consumer vehicles. The last time I remember hearing about indexing plugs was on an Arctic Cat racing snowmobile (2-stroke) back around 2012. Anyone have any idea what might have caused Ford to make this change?

Thus guy does very good videos. Really helped me out on my 5.4L.
 

MidLifeRaptor

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Interesting find! I wonder if the raptor gets the same plug as the regular eco 3.5? They were different in years prior possibly heat ranges im not sure, part numbers were different I believe.

I guess the first 22+ gen3 guy to change plugs will have to let us know!

I’d try mine, but I wonder if that gasket can be torqued twice?
 

1BAD454SSv2

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So are they pointing the ground strap towards the intake valves or the exhaust valves???? A lot of the theories which way is best if open side is facing intake valve and the injector fuel could cause a weaker spark . Ground facing intake valves , shrouds tip from the fuel . Interested to know which way they are clocking the plug.
 

Legacy32

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I run a local engine shop in Houston tx. and we do a lot of work with some of the best LS head porters around. One of them being Greg Good, he is known for his LS and Dodge viper engine building. Anyway we clock (index) spark plugs to keep the strap close to a water port to keep the tip from getting hot and melting. This is of course in race cars where we push the limits of timing and fuel, to get the absolute most power we can.


But typically you would index the ground strap 180 out from the intake
 

phantom150

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Reviving this a bit, I have a 21' that had the engine replaced under warranty with a service engine so a 22' 3.5 replacement. I have tried to find a stage colder plug for an upgrade but cannot find a plug that has the flat washer like referenced above, has anyone been able to find a stage colder plug that isn't tapered? I believe my plugs are already needing replacement and I need to upgrade anyways to accommodate my upgrades. Thanks in advance!
 

SurfRaptor

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I don’t want to take away from your question but I have about 20k on my MY22 Gen 3 and was wondering what milage you were changing your plugs at? I was thinking of doing this service every 30k which I know is overkill but it was easy enough to do on my 08 JKU and I would get a much smoother engine idle and performance. It seems pretty easy to do on the Gen 3 also. For spare parts while I’m off roading I got a spare plug and ignition coil just in case. I’ll list those part numbers down below. Thanks for any info from anyone who’s done this job already.

Spark plug - motorcraft SP596
Ignition coil - motorcraft DG584
 

TwizzleStix

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I’ve found spark plug life depends on the fuel used and quality of said fuel. I have 78+k on the original plugs in my 2018 running Exxon 93 blended to 50% with E85. It makes really good power. I thought it was may be missing a bit at very light throttle yesterday, so I floored it through about 3 gears and it’s just fine. I may swap them out at 80k, or maybe 100k, or just wait until it actually sees a misfire event so I know how far they will go.
 

SurfRaptor

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Thanks for the info. Has anyone done this in the Gen 3 yet that can give some advice on what they would have done differently. It seems changing the plugs and cleaning the throttle body is always a great way to keep vehicles running smoothly.
 
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