Bent tie rods from minor rut G3 2022

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taquitos

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You all need to chill with the tire pressure stuff. Recommended is 38. 40 is not so much more that you’re going to be screwed. It can still do plenty of stuff at 38 psi without issue. Is it ideal? No. But if anything is so close to failure that 2 psi tire pressure pushes it over the limit then the design is straight trash. I think Ford has done enough due diligence that this IS NOT the case. There is a reason this happened other than tire pressure. My best theory right now is alignment at full compression was either toed out or in such that it caught and tried to turn both wheels in hard. The rut would have had to be V shaped to buckle both on its own and it’s not. If that were to be the case and it just needed to be aligned to be more neutral at full compression maybe it could save us some headaches in a very simple way.
 

Old-Raptor-guy

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You all need to chill with the tire pressure stuff. Recommended is 38. 40 is not so much more that you’re going to be screwed. It can still do plenty of stuff at 38 psi without issue. Is it ideal? No. But if anything is so close to failure that 2 psi tire pressure pushes it over the limit then the design is straight trash. I think Ford has done enough due diligence that this IS NOT the case. There is a reason this happened other than tire pressure. My best theory right now is alignment at full compression was either toed out or in such that it caught and tried to turn both wheels in hard. The rut would have had to be V shaped to buckle both on its own and it’s not. If that were to be the case and it just needed to be aligned to be more neutral at full compression maybe it could save us some headaches in a very simple way.
Do you off road at all??????

Tire pressure had little to do with this failure no doubt.

But those of us that do off road a majority of miles

(Which by the way the OP claims to off road more than the majority of the majority)

Understand that lower tire pressure is a huge factor in off roading. the FACT the OP doesn't "air down" pretty much puts into question his whole

"I am a cop (which means shit really) and off roading ******* king" story

The tierod and shock operate under different forces. the shock being stiff which is vertical forces has little to do with tierod which is lateral forces.

He hit the obstacle at the wrong angle. there is a reason you should pre-run a course. Again some off road God would know this.

There are a couple roads I have been driving for over 20 years and have no issue going 90mph+ on. could drive them blind folded. unfamiliar roads I don't drive like a retard.
 
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Old-Raptor-guy

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The OP says both tierods bent in (which is obvious).

Let's go with a chain of events.

Op hits obstacle at roughly 45 degrees with left front tire, left inner tie rod bends, this jerks steering wheel from OP hands and then milliseconds later right front tire hits obstacle at wrong angle and bends inner tie rod end.

This would be observed as one "incident " by driver but in fact would be multiple "incidents "
 
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taquitos

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Do you off road at all??????

Tire pressure had little to do with this failure no doubt.

But those of us that do off road a majority of miles

(Which by the way the OP claims to off road more than the majority of the majority)

Understand that lower tire pressure is a huge factor in off roading. the FACT the OP doesn't "air down" pretty much puts into question his whole

"I am a cop (which means shit really) and off roading ******* king" story

The tierod and shock operate under different forces. the shock being stiff which is vertical forces has little to do with tierod which is lateral forces.

He hit the obstacle at the wrong angle. there is a reason you should pre-run a course. Again some off road God would know this.

There are a couple roads I have been driving for over 20 years and have no issue going 90mph+ on. could drive them blind folded. unfamiliar roads I don't drive like a retard.
I’ve very literally driven over things larger than that going faster than that without airing down. Why? Sometimes I don’t want to be that guy waisting their friend’s time because they have to air down every time they leave the mall. It’s reasonable to expect the truck to do it no problem. If you all have driven off road as much as you say, you’d recognize that rut isn’t a big deal.

You all don’t seem to grasp the design process for OE stuff. You have to assume it will be used at the tire pressure on the door everywhere and throw a factor of safety at it. The suspension 100% factors into tie rod load too. If you are bottomed out your wheel can’t move out of the way of anything which matters up until the point an impact is pretty much entirely from the side. On top of that, to get both tie rods to buckle you can’t just hit a straight rut off angle. It would buckle one side, but not the other. Tie rods only buckle in compression. It would take a V shaped rut to buckle both and that rut was not V shaped. That’s where toe in vs out at bottom of travel could start to matter. If alignment is out or got knocked out you could definitely cause tie rod damage by hitting a rut completely square while bottomed out. When bottomed out loads are orders of magnitude higher too.
 

downforce137

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You all need to chill with the tire pressure stuff. Recommended is 38. 40 is not so much more that you’re going to be screwed. It can still do plenty of stuff at 38 psi without issue. Is it ideal? No. But if anything is so close to failure that 2 psi tire pressure pushes it over the limit then the design is straight trash. I think Ford has done enough due diligence that this IS NOT the case. There is a reason this happened other than tire pressure. My best theory right now is alignment at full compression was either toed out or in such that it caught and tried to turn both wheels in hard. The rut would have had to be V shaped to buckle both on its own and it’s not. If that were to be the case and it just needed to be aligned to be more neutral at full compression maybe it could save us some headaches in a very simple way.

maybe you need to read your raptor supplemental manual... we not going to chill on driving fast off road with 40psi... sorry its dumb, the tire is not doing its job, and i bet really theres more to the story than just hitting the little wash in the pics..

full compression is toe out, but also not much because bump steer is in check on stock suspension... mostly.

there is a video of streetspeed717 breaking both tie rods on a hill climb, with big mud tires on a 37 package that he had briefly.. hes also a youtube guy out there doing things for views so watch the video and decide for yourself..

get a milwaukee m18 inflator.. i can fill all 4 tires from 15psi in minutes.. multiple times on the same battery and it auto shuts off so its not like you need to stand there and watch it..

but then again, i ran 25psi in vegas and then drove home to indiana on 25psi, because there really was no bad side effects... 32psi keeps the tire light off, so thats what i run year round.. 12psi dunes, 15psi mud races, 20psi hard pack, 25psi mixed off road/highway, 32psi all pavement.. these trucks ride like **** at 38-40psi... especially with heavy Toyo M/Ts

no broken tie rods here...
 
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taquitos

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maybe you need to read your raptor supplemental manual... we not going to chill on driving fast off road with 40psi... sorry its dumb, the tire is not doing its job, and i bet really theres more to the story than just hitting the little wash in the pics..

full compression is toe out, but also not much because bump steer is in check on stock suspension... mostly.

there is a video of streetspeed717 breaking both tie rods on a hill climb, with big mud tires on a 37 package that he had briefly.. hes also a youtube guy out there doing things for views so watch the video and decide for yourself..

get a milwaukee m18 inflator.. i can fill all 4 tires from 15psi in minutes.. multiple times on the same battery and it auto shuts off so its not like you need to stand there and watch it..
I mean it’s either there’s more to the story, bad luck with a bunch of combined factors, or Ford didn’t really intend the 37 to be for fast things. But I guarantee they considered off road with the tire pressure listed on the door. Considering the guy posted a different picture of a massive **** up I’m assuming he’s not shy about accidentally doing something wrong.

If I remember right the tie rod broke with the front fairly extended whereas this rut would most likely have been bottomed out so I have a feeling it’s a different cause. Rut would bottom it out potentially. If it’s toed out and full compression and alignment was off such that it was toed in even more, hitting the inside back half of the tire on a square edge would try and turn the wheels in potentially quite hard.
 
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