6.2L spark plug change - tips and tricks

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allinon72

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Just completed replacement of all 16 plugs - thought I'd add some additional information besides the standard DIY threads that already exist.

First - this is probably not a job you want to tackle if it's your first time changing spark plugs. It can be done, but it's quite rigorous and might make you never want to do spark plugs again :D

The job took me about 3 hours working leisurely. I've done spark plugs on a half dozen different vehicles so I had an idea of what I was getting into. There's really no quick way of doing this job even if everything goes perfect just based on the sheer number of plugs to replace.

For the bottom plugs, I jacked up the truck via framerail until the tire was nearly off the ground. This allowed me to stick my whole upper body in the wheel well and rest on the tire. Taking the tires off is not necessary and would probably make things harder. Before starting, I drove around the block to warm the engine (don't get it fully up to temp).

You'll want to have a magnetic spark plug swivel socket for this job. It saves a lot of time and headaches. I used Gearwrench part #80546. You'll also want to have a 3" extension, 6" extension, 10" extension, a 3/8" swivel, and a regular 5/8" spark plug socket.

In the pic below, I labeled each tool, and here is the combination of sockets/extensions I used to remove each plug (back to front):

20190610_162549.jpg

D/S Bottom
  • ACD
  • ACD
  • ACD
  • ACD
P/S Bottom
  • AC
  • AC
  • BC
  • BEFC***
D/S Top
  • BD
  • BC
  • BC
  • BC
P/S Top
  • BDE
  • BC
  • BC
  • BC
***The problem child is the p/s bottom front-most plug. This is the one everyone struggles with because it's directly behind the shock tower and there is NOT a lot of room. In fact, you can barely see it. Below is a pic of how you'll have to get to that one (best pic I could get). You just have to play around with it a little bit - it's frustrating but definitely doable.
20190610_121615.jpg

I preferred to thread the new plugs back in with the regular (non-swivel) spark plug socket, just to reduce the chance of cross threading.

The top plugs are easy compared to the bottoms. I started with the bottoms, just because I knew if I got those done, I was home free.

If anyone has any other questions, I'd be happy to help.

20190610_144444.jpg
 

EricM

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If that pic shows the toughest one, it looks like a walk in the park!

Got 16 plugs and a set of wires waiting for me to dig into it one day. Still under 60K miles, so no hurry.

Haven't seen it mentioned here, but some guys rotate the coils so the ones in front go to the back and vice versa. Supposedly helps even out the wear from engine heat.

How many miles on your used plugs, and what was the average gap looking like?
 
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allinon72

allinon72

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If that pic shows the toughest one, it looks like a walk in the park!

Got 16 plugs and a set of wires waiting for me to dig into it one day. Still under 60K miles, so no hurry.

Haven't seen it mentioned here, but some guys rotate the coils so the ones in front go to the back and vice versa. Supposedly helps even out the wear from engine heat.

How many miles on your used plugs, and what was the average gap looking like?

The pic is deceiving - it's certainly not a walk in the park! You'll see what I mean once you get in there.

I just bought the truck, has 65k, nothing in the service history about spark plug replacement, but the top plugs looked a lot better than the bottom plugs, which leads me to believe someone might have just replaced the easy ones. Gaps were still pretty good, maybe a thousand or so out of spec.
 

FNG in FL duhhh

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Just completed replacement of all 16 plugs - thought I'd add some additional information besides the standard DIY threads that already exist.

First - this is probably not a job you want to tackle if it's your first time changing spark plugs. It can be done, but it's quite rigorous and might make you never want to do spark plugs again :D

The job took me about 3 hours working leisurely. I've done spark plugs on a half dozen different vehicles so I had an idea of what I was getting into. There's really no quick way of doing this job even if everything goes perfect just based on the sheer number of plugs to replace.

For the bottom plugs, I jacked up the truck via framerail until the tire was nearly off the ground. This allowed me to stick my whole upper body in the wheel well and rest on the tire. Taking the tires off is not necessary and would probably make things harder. Before starting, I drove around the block to warm the engine (don't get it fully up to temp).

You'll want to have a magnetic spark plug swivel socket for this job. It saves a lot of time and headaches. I used Gearwrench part #80546. You'll also want to have a 3" extension, 6" extension, 10" extension, a 3/8" swivel, and a regular 5/8" spark plug socket.

In the pic below, I labeled each tool, and here is the combination of sockets/extensions I used to remove each plug (back to front):

View attachment 124624

D/S Bottom
  • ACD
  • ACD
  • ACD
  • ACD
P/S Bottom
  • AC
  • AC
  • BC
  • BEFC***
D/S Top
  • BD
  • BC
  • BC
  • BC
P/S Top
  • BDE
  • BC
  • BC
  • BC
***The problem child is the p/s bottom front-most plug. This is the one everyone struggles with because it's directly behind the shock tower and there is NOT a lot of room. In fact, you can barely see it. Below is a pic of how you'll have to get to that one (best pic I could get). You just have to play around with it a little bit - it's frustrating but definitely doable.
View attachment 124628

I preferred to thread the new plugs back in with the regular (non-swivel) spark plug socket, just to reduce the chance of cross threading.

The top plugs are easy compared to the bottoms. I started with the bottoms, just because I knew if I got those done, I was home free.

If anyone has any other questions, I'd be happy to help.

View attachment 124629


Jw what plugs you went with? I hear NGK (which I’ve always used on my other cars) and Motorcraft a lot. Did you change the plug wires also? If so which ones did you go with? Btw great info.
 

EricM

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The pic is deceiving - it's certainly not a walk in the park! You'll see what I mean once you get in there.

I just bought the truck, has 65k, nothing in the service history about spark plug replacement, but the top plugs looked a lot better than the bottom plugs, which leads me to believe someone might have just replaced the easy ones. Gaps were still pretty good, maybe a thousand or so out of spec.

Was kind of kidding. It's all relative. I thought the plugs on my '00 5.4L 2V weren't all that bad, and people went on and on about how hard they were. Haven't done a 6.2L, but I imagine it's pretty much doing it twice- a mod motor up top and a 302 windsor down low.
 
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allinon72

allinon72

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Was kind of kidding. It's all relative. I thought the plugs on my '00 5.4L 2V weren't all that bad, and people went on and on about how hard they were. Haven't done a 6.2L, but I imagine it's pretty much doing it twice- a mod motor up top and a 302 windsor down low.

I've done a 4.6 2v - probably 3/10 in difficulty. 5.4 3v was about a 5/10. 6.2 is 8/10
 
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allinon72

allinon72

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Jw what plugs you went with? I hear NGK (which I’ve always used on my other cars) and Motorcraft a lot. Did you change the plug wires also? If so which ones did you go with? Btw great info.

Just went with the OEM Motorcrafts. I decided not to change the wires because mine are still in great shape and I didn't see the need. They would be easy enough down the road if necessary. It would be a 30 minute job to do just the wires.
 

Ricoman

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Just completed replacement of all 16 plugs - thought I'd add some additional information besides the standard DIY threads that already exist.

First - this is probably not a job you want to tackle if it's your first time changing spark plugs. It can be done, but it's quite rigorous and might make you never want to do spark plugs again :D

The job took me about 3 hours working leisurely. I've done spark plugs on a half dozen different vehicles so I had an idea of what I was getting into. There's really no quick way of doing this job even if everything goes perfect just based on the sheer number of plugs to replace.

For the bottom plugs, I jacked up the truck via framerail until the tire was nearly off the ground. This allowed me to stick my whole upper body in the wheel well and rest on the tire. Taking the tires off is not necessary and would probably make things harder. Before starting, I drove around the block to warm the engine (don't get it fully up to temp).

You'll want to have a magnetic spark plug swivel socket for this job. It saves a lot of time and headaches. I used Gearwrench part #80546. You'll also want to have a 3" extension, 6" extension, 10" extension, a 3/8" swivel, and a regular 5/8" spark plug socket.

In the pic below, I labeled each tool, and here is the combination of sockets/extensions I used to remove each plug (back to front):

View attachment 124624

D/S Bottom
  • ACD
  • ACD
  • ACD
  • ACD
P/S Bottom
  • AC
  • AC
  • BC
  • BEFC***
D/S Top
  • BD
  • BC
  • BC
  • BC
P/S Top
  • BDE
  • BC
  • BC
  • BC
***The problem child is the p/s bottom front-most plug. This is the one everyone struggles with because it's directly behind the shock tower and there is NOT a lot of room. In fact, you can barely see it. Below is a pic of how you'll have to get to that one (best pic I could get). You just have to play around with it a little bit - it's frustrating but definitely doable.
View attachment 124628

I preferred to thread the new plugs back in with the regular (non-swivel) spark plug socket, just to reduce the chance of cross threading.

The top plugs are easy compared to the bottoms. I started with the bottoms, just because I knew if I got those done, I was home free.

If anyone has any other questions, I'd be happy to help.

View attachment 124629

Great post and info....!! Only have 55K on mine....and dreading the drama in 5-10K when I have to do...hopefully this info and photos will make is a little easier....just cant see paying the dealer $400+ to change plugs,especially since I've changed the plugs in ALL my vehicles for years...Thanks !!
 
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