Who Makes Beef Jerky?

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Shane361

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I make jerky on my smoker... here's what I do:
  1. Partially freeze the unsliced meat, maybe for an hour or so, and then pull it out and slice it right away. You don't want it rock hard so that your knife won't go through it, but the more frozen it is (up to a point), the easier it is to get consisten slices (assuming you're usinng a knife, and not using a slicer).
  2. Once you've got it sliced, mix up a marinade. You can google recipes. One that I've read a lot about is a Dr. Pepper and jalapeno marinade, but I've never tried it. I always forget to look up new recipes when I'm making mine, and I just stick to my tried and true recipe (which is basically soy sauce, worcestershire, teriyaki, garlic powder, cayenne, onion powder, salt, red pepper flakes, brown sugar, and honey).
  3. Put the sliced meat in a gallon ziploc bag and pour the marinade in there, and put it in the fridge for a minimum of 4 hours. Usually I let it marinate an overnight.
  4. When ready to cook, pull the slices out, lay them flat, and use a paper towel to pat them dry.
  5. Smoke/cook until done!
  6. Enjoy! :cheers:
Awesome thanks! Yeah those are the typical ingredients I've been seeing. I did see the Dr. Pepper one on a chic's video and I love Dr. Pepper so gonna have to try that. I'm gonna go for a Beef Bulgogi this weekend.
 

Ski4Ever

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What temp on the smoker and how long does it usually take you?
I do as low as possible on the smoker (usually 160ish, but it climbs about 180 depending on the weather...easier to keep lower smoker temps when the weather isn't as hot), and it usually takes 2-3 hours or so. At least 2 hours for sure, I'd say, and then start checking every half hour for it to be done (whatever you consider done), depending on how dried out you want it to be, and how thick you sliced it, etc.

Oh yeah, and as soon as I pull it off, I put it straight into a sealed ziploc bag in order to keep the moisture in. And then keep it in the fridge, and it will last for weeks (if you don't eat it before then, that is...haha).
 

GordoJay

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Low fat cuts generally make the best jerky. I've had really good luck with beef heart. It's cheap and very low in fat. I prefer my jerky to have no sugar and lots of spice. And absolutely zero moisture. Think New Mexico style carne seca. It isn't for everyone, but if the gooey sweet stuff you buy over the counter doesn't do it for you, you should try some.
 

HighHP

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i have four recipes. See attached. I did unmarked taste tests at multiple parties and asked people to pick their favorite. One stood out as really good by many. The key ingredient is Habanero. It is first on the list noted as "Best Recipe".

Take note of the comments on each recipe. And be sure to use the brand name product as noted, others are not as good.

If you buy your meat at the store, ask the butcher to slice it for you 1/4" thick. They are happy to do it for free. The less fat the better.

Oak sawdust or chips also was favored, by far. You can get them from any oak wood shop, etc.
 

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Shane361

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Just threw my marinated cuts into the dehydrator. I'm skeptic on my marinade. Will go with a tried and true if this fails. My cuts are a little thick as well, we'll see. Need to work on uniformity and I'll check with the butcher.
 

GordoJay

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These are great to monitor temps in various places in the smoker. May need to drill a little hole. Also. you can check your cars AC performance.
When I bought my smoker, I seasoned it by covering every square inch of grate with bacon. Smoked it for a half hour or so at 200-225 and then crisped it at 350. The hot spots cooked a lot faster, so now I know where they are. The upside of the technique? A couple pounds of double-smoked bacon. You haven't lived until you try double-smoked bacon ....
 
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