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Think I blew up my front diff

Discussion in 'Ford F-150 Raptor General Discussions [GEN 2]' started by Turbogoat324, Oct 6, 2019.

  1. Badgertits

    Badgertits Full Access Member

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    I don't get why you'd be in 4LO in that situation I would assume would've been putting more stress on the front diff if you were in 4A or 4HI (I acknowledge 4A may not have been up to task for it) - but in also why have the rear diff locked? I may be thinking too much into this, but rear diff locked gives the propensity/willingness to "give it all ya got" on loose gravel w/o concern as too how much wheel spin you're generating however you may inadvertently have been giving way more throttle than you normally would/should have for what the front could handle in 4LO if you DIDN'T lock the rear diff - does that make any sense?

    I kinda thought that was precisely why it was a nice option to have the torsen front diff in rear - less stress on the front in extreme 4x4 situations where you'd want to be doing what you described - having the rear diff locked but still wanting all the balls of 4LO?
     
  2. highway420

    highway420 Full Access Member

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    It's about weight distro and traction when lockers are used 99% of the time. It's very easy for a tire to lose enough grip when unloaded, or just enough weight is lifted...suspension moving, incline/decline, going over rocks, anything uneven. Lockers aren't for just doughnuts and dusting your friends at camp or on top of the dunes, LOL... Our truck is obviously light in the back and will lose traction easier because of it.
    Jeep has been putting lockers in since 2003 with the rubicon pkg. and they put in front also...and from factory, locks front first and then back, so you can make through almost everything if you drive it right.

    And most of the factory lockers will also be a limited slip.. most.
     
  3. Asinine

    Asinine Full Access Member

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    I have a Jeep Rubicon and this is inaccurate. Lockers are lockers, they’re either on or off, there is no limited slip. The factory choices for locking are either rear locked only or both locked, there is no front locked only option. I’ve modded my Jeep so I can control them independently, but otherwise it’s a preset factory behavior.

    You should wheel unlocked and only engage the lockers when necessary. Locking things up adds traction while concurrently increasing the odds of breaking things, as OP learned. When I’m out in the Jeep, my lockers rarely get used, I always attempt the obstacle first then hit the buttons if necessary.

    Never try to pull or tow in reverse. The gears are cut for maximum strength going forward.

    OP - sorry to hear, hopefully it’s covered under warranty.
     
  4. highway420

    highway420 Full Access Member

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    LOL ok, well..Right back at you. o_O What year is your Jeep? Rubi model has changed things over the years..
    I have a 2006 model that had different lockers. First, my rear is a limited slip. It's called a mechanical-helical gear limited slip...doesn't mean it 'locked up'.. it didn't have the normal spider gear setup and was able to vector the output. Info was also according to the factory spec and manual. They were also air lockers ( which rumored to be made by ARB as they operated identically to - but worked on 7 PSI instead of the 15-20)
    And finally, yes, the front went on first and could be on only. How i know this? Well, driving it, reading the manual, and oh yeah..when I re-wired the factory switch to put rear on first. The newer more chinese E locs you guys got work differently and may not have the fancy limited slip the TJ/LJ's had.
    I don't agree with having to lock front first, and this is prob why they changed it as nobody really knows how to steer a locked axle well. This is also why I changed it... in part cause I wanted it send out rear end while blasting around soft ground and flat areas, but mostly didn't like how the front went on first.
    That's when Jeep still had the inline 6 and domestic dana 44's and not the imports.

    I totally agree with this. This is the correct way to use lockers. Seen/heard way too many breaks cause people can't control the skinny while locked or just trying to gun it thru.

    To OP's defense tho, our raptors don't lock the front or use the braking method of locking loose wheel (do they? ) I know it's a torson, which thought is a type of limited slip...? I've only used 4 lo few times as I've done tons in my jeep.

    there's a weak point in Fords design, our OP had front tires jammed and turned. :console:W/ 500+ lbs of force, can build up rather quickly.
    It's ok, Ford should fix no prob.--Ford still advertises the shit out of our truck as the badest offroad and can't turn back now.
     
  5. Loufish

    Loufish Full Access Member

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    Based on what?....it can't be on just one post?.....
     
  6. isis

    isis Member

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    Dummy here. I have the torsen front and rear. Does the truck control the locker or is that an automatic thing in driving modes or 4H and 4L?
     
  7. Loufish

    Loufish Full Access Member

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    Are you talking about the Raptor because it doesn't have a Torsen in the rear, just an "on/off" E-locker...It can have a Torsen in front...
     
  8. isis

    isis Member

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    Told you I was a dummy. 802a with Torsen front option. Thought that made it the same as rear. Bought it used couple weeks ago and trying to get up to speed. Haven’t gotten too far into how the drivetrain does it’s thing.
     
  9. highway420

    highway420 Full Access Member

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    LOL... No. although some did chime in saying they blew there's too. I was really trying to nudge the OP... It's hard to blow an open diff unless you really get it jammed. But with over 400hp and 550 torque... anythings possible LOL

    I am no expert per say, but have years of experience building my jeep (with my hands not paying a shop to do it) and off road it going through some tough obstacles and seen a lot and broken enough. I once did a trail in AZ named 'bad idea' . LOL... you literally could not turn around once once you went in. Then it started to rain.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019 at 7:26 PM
  10. highway420

    highway420 Full Access Member

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    To make it a little easier, they call it a 'selectable locker'.. meaning driver can switch on. However, you are limited to when you can do this. usually it's 4 Lo. and with Raptor, I believe there are other modes you can put on but you may have to 'trick' the computer/modes by switching certain modes and drive selection (rotary knob)..
    If you're totally new to lockers, then don't really worry about it right now. There's a lot more to it then just switching it on whenever. The truck, to my knowledge, will not automatically put it on....?

    the front is a limited slip in raptor. look it up everyone.:cool: Very similar (if not same) to what my Jeep has.. clutchless limited slip. Good stuff

    " Ford Performance Parts Torsen differentials use a worm gear friction system that will not wear out like conventional clutch-type positive traction differentials. These differentials ensure your engine's power is transferred to the wheels with the maximum traction. The unique torque-sensing ability of the Torsen design, and the smooth engagement of Torsen-style limited-slip differentials, make them the perfect choice for your street, strip, or off-road vehicle. " :33:
     

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