The Raptor in it’s Natural Habitat…

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John M BUNMAN

John M BUNMAN

BUNMAN-Adventures, Rescue & Recovery
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Listen up!

I know you are running stock offset/backspace wheels, there probably isn’t a ton of mud where you wheel, etc. but how is your truck always clean for a pic??

I also know people give you a hard time about cleaning your truck before photos.

Do you? Do you use filters or #nofilter?


Also it is almost insane how good your blue looks with the local terrain! I always enjoy seeing them.
Ohhhkayyy, Seriously,
1. No filters on the lens except a UV which is there mainly to protect the glass. I learned that from a Pro-Shooter, much cheaper to replace a filter than a lens.
2. My Molten Orange was my favorite, my black was Always dirty and the Velocity Blue amazingly Always looks clean?
3. Lighting, a good image is always enhanced by the proper lighting (friends words, not mine.lol) A lot of my images are the same with just a different angle or lighting, which can totally change the image. That’s why I love the “picture clouds” they can make a ok image, spectacular.
4. Look at EVERYTHING you see in the Viewfinder. (Shot Composition)
Having an interesting background along with the focal point of your shot, will keep the viewer of the image from focusing on the imperfections of your focal point. Ie: the dirt and dust on the Raptor.
My wife will drive me crazy when I have her take an image. She will leave 20’ of Foreground in front of the focal point of the shot??? Lol
5. Lots of MFing Wax! :buffer::buffer:
It’s a lot easier to keep her cleaned and waxed in the desert environment. If I’m not waxing it, I’m using a ceramic spray after I wash it. (My life is Play with Grand-babies, Hike, Off-Road…REPEAT)
The waxes keep the micro-scratches (desert pinstripes) hidden fairly well, all but the deepest ones.
6. If you zoom in closely, you can see the dust and scratches but only to the extent of the upload quality. Everything is shot at 20megs but probably upload less depending on the site host? ( I’m try to sound intelligent, I don’t understand any of that shixt…:( )
7. **NUMBER ONE TIP**
DON’T SHOOT ON AUTO SETTING!!
I learned this from a Pro fro Australia one Early 0400 morning in Yosemite, trying to capture the Sunrise from Inspiration Point ( ANSEL ADADMS, famous Yosemite Black & Whites)
He explained to me that shooting everything on Auto, Overexposed the images, leaving you nothing to work with later. He took the time to show me how to shoot in manual and adjust the light settings. The other thing he taught me was to take 3-images of every shot I really wanted to keep. One on what looked like the correct lighting and then another one stop above and one stop below that..
It can be exhausting and I rarely do it properly. I shoot and hope for the best…lol, not like I’m using film anymore thank God!
8. I may sound like I know what I’m doing behind the lens … but that is farrrrrr from the truth. I don’t know how to use most of the settings on my camera. I’m just parroting what the Australian and Victor have taught. Vic is the one that taught me how to slow the water down to give it the cotton candy effect.
I am lucky to have a decent Eye for Shot-Composition, which hides a lot of my lack of skill.
Thank You Again for the kind words. I’m glad some people like shots and are motivated to get their own when the opportunity comes:) BF67C43E-583E-4631-BD76-46B437D65600.jpeg 664A0C58-7823-4797-B8E1-14BEAC8C1C05.jpeg 0F4E6171-4FF1-4A65-AE8A-5099ED0B1F16.jpeg E1D10D9A-7897-474E-BE7B-37B10E00814B.jpeg
 

Jakenbake

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Ohhhkayyy, Seriously,
1. No filters on the lens except a UV which is there mainly to protect the glass. I learned that from a Pro-Shooter, much cheaper to replace a filter than a lens.
2. My Molten Orange was my favorite, my black was Always dirty and the Velocity Blue amazingly Always looks clean?
3. Lighting, a good image is always enhanced by the proper lighting (friends words, not mine.lol) A lot of my images are the same with just a different angle or lighting, which can totally change the image. That’s why I love the “picture clouds” they can make a ok image, spectacular.
4. Look at EVERYTHING you see in the Viewfinder. (Shot Composition)
Having an interesting background along with the focal point of your shot, will keep the viewer of the image from focusing on the imperfections of your focal point. Ie: the dirt and dust on the Raptor.
My wife will drive me crazy when I have her take an image. She will leave 20’ of Foreground in front of the focal point of the shot??? Lol
5. Lots of MFing Wax! :buffer::buffer:
It’s a lot easier to keep her cleaned and waxed in the desert environment. If I’m not waxing it, I’m using a ceramic spray after I wash it. (My life is Play with Grand-babies, Hike, Off-Road…REPEAT)
The waxes keep the micro-scratches (desert pinstripes) hidden fairly well, all but the deepest ones.
6. If you zoom in closely, you can see the dust and scratches but only to the extent of the upload quality. Everything is shot at 20megs but probably upload less depending on the site host? ( I’m try to sound intelligent, I don’t understand any of that shixt…:( )
7. **NUMBER ONE TIP**
DON’T SHOOT ON AUTO SETTING!!
I learned this from a Pro fro Australia one Early 0400 morning in Yosemite, trying to capture the Sunrise from Inspiration Point ( ANSEL ADADMS, famous Yosemite Black & Whites)
He explained to me that shooting everything on Auto, Overexposed the images, leaving you nothing to work with later. He took the time to show me how to shoot in manual and adjust the light settings. The other thing he taught me was to take 3-images of every shot I really wanted to keep. One on what looked like the correct lighting and then another one stop above and one stop below that..
It can be exhausting and I rarely do it properly. I shoot and hope for the best…lol, not like I’m using film anymore thank God!
8. I may sound like I know what I’m doing behind the lens … but that is farrrrrr from the truth. I don’t know how to use most of the settings on my camera. I’m just parroting what the Australian and Victor have taught. Vic is the one that taught me how to slow the water down to give it the cotton candy effect.
I am lucky to have a decent Eye for Shot-Composition, which hides a lot of my lack of skill.
Thank You Again for the kind words. I’m glad some people like shots and are motivated to get their own when the opportunity comes:) View attachment 364980 View attachment 364981 View attachment 364982 View attachment 364983
Great info!
 
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