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GEN 2 Looking to buy toy hauler...info needed/wanted!

Discussion in 'Ford F-150 Raptor General Discussions [GEN 2]' started by Ski4Ever, May 23, 2019.

  1. Ski4Ever

    Ski4Ever Member

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    Hi all,

    I'm looking to buy a toy hauler for my '19 Screw. I've never owned a big travel trailer like that before...only had a small utility trailer in the past and currently have a teardrop trailer. So, a lot of what I'm going to ask may be considered newbie questions (and/or stupid questions...haha), but I'm trying to make sure I have as much info as possible. I like to research before buying something!

    Anyway, I'm looking at something like a Forest River Grey Wolf 22RR, or maybe a 25RRT or 26RR. I've got a few questions related to things I've been reading online and in the user manual:

    1. I see that it's definitely recommended/necessary to get a weight distributing hitch, but I don't know anything about them. I believe I want 10-15% of total weight for the tongue weight, so depending on the model and loading, I'll have a tongue weight around 600-800lbs. I'm assuming I can get a WDH that's built for that range, right? Other than being able to get them in different sizes, they have a pretty universal fit, correct? Any recommendations on a good (but also cost effective) option for the WDH?
    2. I was looking at Andersen WDHs, and I see they come with different drop/rise amounts. How do I figure out what one I need before I drive hundreds of miles to go pick up a trailer (there aren't any local to me)? I need the WDH before I can tow it, but won't know the height of the trailer when level until I get to the trailer, right? I can't seem to find that spec anywhere online...
    3. When looking at certain WDH info, I saw something about surge brakes...what are surge brakes? It seems to be something built into the trailer (or maybe something you can add on later), but is that something that's compatible with the Raptor? Again, I don't know what I'm talking about here...
    4. I've seen some info online about bump stops, and/or bump stop kits. Is that something I'd need to look into? Again, any good (and cost effective) options there?
    5. Are the stock springs going to be sufficient?
    6. Is there a way to do an air bag setup with the Raptor? Or is that not even possible, or a bad idea, etc? I don't know anything about air bag suspensions, other than knowing that I have a couple friends with trucks (not Raptors) that have air bags for hauling/towing.
    7. Anything else I am missing out on that I'll need to do in order to tow a toy hauler?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Supergumby5000

    Supergumby5000 Full Access Member

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    I see that it's definitely recommended/necessary to get a weight distributing hitch, but I don't know anything about them. I believe I want 10-15% of total weight for the tongue weight, so depending on the model and loading, I'll have a tongue weight around 600-800lbs. I'm assuming I can get a WDH that's built for that range, right? Other than being able to get them in different sizes, they have a pretty universal fit, correct? Any recommendations on a good (but also cost effective) option for the WDH?

    As long as you are going with a reputable name, any weight distribution hitch you find will work just fine. You arent towing a lot of weight. All WDH tensioner bars are adjustable to fit whatever tongue weight you are trying to achieve, and that shouldnt be a problem with such a small trailer.

    I was looking at Andersen WDHs, and I see they come with different drop/rise amounts. How do I figure out what one I need before I drive hundreds of miles to go pick up a trailer (there aren't any local to me)? I need the WDH before I can tow it, but won't know the height of the trailer when level until I get to the trailer, right? I can't seem to find that spec anywhere online...

    Measure your hitch height. Have the trailer dealer measure the tongue height. Do the math. Account for a couple inches of sag.

    When looking at certain WDH info, I saw something about surge brakes...what are surge brakes? It seems to be something built into the trailer (or maybe something you can add on later), but is that something that's compatible with the Raptor? Again, I don't know what I'm talking about here...

    The WDH has nothing to do with the braking capability of the trailer. That is all truck/trailer dependent. Some trailers have a braking system built into the tongue of the trailer by way of reading pressure created while braking. This is trailer specific though, and will not impact your WDH selection.

    I've seen some info online about bump stops, and/or bump stop kits. Is that something I'd need to look into? Again, any good (and cost effective) options there?

    I wouldnt worry about bump stops if you are using a WDH. You can get them if you want to I guess. Timbren bump stops would be the most affordable.

    Are the stock springs going to be sufficient?

    That depends. Your truck has a tow rating. Dont exceed it and you wont have issues. A WDH will help reduce spring fatigue.

    Is there a way to do an air bag setup with the Raptor? Or is that not even possible, or a bad idea, etc? I don't know anything about air bag suspensions, other than knowing that I have a couple friends with trucks (not Raptors) that have air bags for hauling/towing.

    Cant help you here. I'm sure there is a way to get an airbag set up on a raptor, it just might not be off the shelf. I think this is overkill for occasionally towing a small toy hauler, especially when you are planning on using a WDH

    Anything else I am missing out on that I'll need to do in order to tow a toy hauler?

    Ask about tongue weight. Some toy haulers have a LOT of tongue weight, some dont. Pay attention to the layout of the trailer tanks and storage capacity. Many toy haulers have their water tanks behind the axles, thus, the tongue weight is typically greatest when the trailer is empty (the tank and your toys will put weight behind or on top of the axles). Some toy haulers are more 1/2-ton truck friendly, regardless of the trailers maximum weight ratings (apples to apples when loaded, a 5000lb trailer could have greater tongue weight than a 7000lb trailer, for example).
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2019
  3. SL75

    SL75 Full Access Member

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    Seems like a lot to tow with the raptor.
    At very least, Deavers and wdh.
     
  4. smurfslayer

    smurfslayer Be vewwy, vewwy quiet. We’re hunting sasquatch77

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    Seems like the troll wants you to think she knows something. She doesn’t.
     
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  5. Supergumby5000

    Supergumby5000 Full Access Member

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    Pay no attention to SL75. She's one of those forum trolls just trying to be a keyboard warrior with cheetos fingers in mom and dad's basement somewhere. A raptor's tow rating is higher than most 90's 1/2 ton trucks, many of which tow small campers.
     
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  6. Ski4Ever

    Ski4Ever Member

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    Thanks for the info! I've got another couple questions related to your reply...

    I can't remember which WDH I was looking at, but one of them said it wasn't compatible with surge brakes, and I just want to make sure I don't end up with the wrong one!

    That's actually another question I had...I see that the trailers all have a tongue weight listed. The ones I'm looking at that I listed in my original post are 686, 690, and 775lb...I assume that's a dry weight, unloaded, empty, etc, correct? That doesn't give me much flexibility when it comes to the 800lb tongue rating that the Raptor has, right? Does that mean I just need to be careful when loading? Seems like it could be really easy to go over 800lb!

    The UVW of the trailers (4871, 5103, and 5030lb) are well within the maximum trailer weight spec (8000lb), though. And adding ~1500lb for a SxS definitely keeps it below 8000lb and leaves weight for the camping necessities.
     
  7. jgree32

    jgree32 Full Access Member

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    I think you'll be fine.
    I tow a 36' travel trailer with 6200lb dry weight.
    Has to be 7k with stuff loaded in it.
    I use an Equalizer WDH.
    Never an issue towing for over 3k miles now.
     
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  8. rtmozingo

    rtmozingo Full Access Member

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    THANK YOU. So tired of being the only person saying this. Drives me nuts people are like "it isn't a real truck, can't tow anything" when that very statement invalidates the vast majority of trucks older than 10 years old.
     
  9. Dane

    Dane FRF Addict

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    Those FR toy hauler models you have listed have electric brakes, not surge brakes. If you've ever used a Uhaul trailer, that's a surge brake. A surge brake basically has a big piston in the tongue that applies hydraulic force to the trailer brakes when you brake the truck and the trailer pushes against your truck. It avoids the need for a brake controller. I don't like them.

    Most every WD hitch I've seen (including the one I use for my toy hauler) has an adjustable height, so you can adjust it on the spot. I actually had my dealer do mine when I bought my toy hauler, but it's easy enough. You need some big wrenches.

    Next couple items, consider that I'm coming from Gen 1 experience, so it's not identical, but hopefully helps.

    I upgraded my rear springs (Deaver +3) for towing a 5,600 (dry weight) toy hauler - also a Forest River. I also added adjustable bump stops that can lower to act as helper springs. It turns out the Deavers provide enough, and lowering the bump stops isn't needed for me - at least not with a full tank of water, supplies, and two motorcycles. From what I hear, the Gen 2 is softer and sags more, so you may want to consider the bump stop solution. Everything I have researched about airbags says you are going to lose some rear suspension travel. For me, that's not acceptable in a Raptor. So yes, you can definitely install air bags, but you are going to sacrifice for it.
     
  10. Ski4Ever

    Ski4Ever Member

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    Thanks for the info, Dane (and, hello from the Denver area...I'm up in Westminster).

    After looking at the surge brake info, I definitely remember seeing them on Uhauls now that you mention it. Glad to hear that the FR toy haulers have electric brakes.

    I noticed that the WDHs I was looking at online have an adjustable height range, but the ranges were 0-4", or 0-8". I'd rather get the 0-4" if that's possible rather than the 0-8". That's the reason I was asking...it would be really unfortunate if I bought a 0-4" and needed 6" of drop, etc. Out of curiosity, what WDH do you have?

    Also out of curiosity, what year/model FR toy hauler do you have? And what dealer did you use? Somebody local? I haven't found any Raptor friendly toy haulers in stock at local dealers, but I haven't looked everywhere yet.
     

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