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2017 vs 2019 Offroad Shock Comparison Video

Discussion in 'Ford F-150 Raptor General Discussions [GEN 2]' started by rtmozingo, Aug 9, 2019.

  1. rtmozingo

    rtmozingo Full Access Member

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    Round 2 of my suspension comparison videos, this time my stock 2017 vs @Keller Steeler's 2019 with the Fox Live Valve shocks, deavers, and bump stops. I don't think the latter two made much difference, given with how his truck handled against the 2019 I test drove.

    Anyway, here's the video:



    Also, about a year ago I said we'd be getting Fox Live Valve external bypasses soon, and quite a few people said I was crazy, it wasn't happening. Well, look what Foutz motorsports just got in for testing:

    [​IMG]
     
    adam0311 and f150jack like this.
  2. adllewis42

    adllewis42 Full Access Member

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    Sorry if this is a stupid question but what's the benefit you get from changing out these leaf springs and bump stops? FWIW, I bought my Raptor to be more of an overlanding base and not a baja racer but I'm still curious ...

    Thanks for the video!
     
  3. rtmozingo

    rtmozingo Full Access Member

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    Not a dumb question. From the factory, the leaf springs must be balanced between unloaded vs loaded, on-road and offroad performance, and of course cost. Just like the shocks, they have the full gamut of conditions they must cover, which makes them jack-of-all trades, master of none.

    Many people complain about the back end jitteriness our trucks have over small bumps, and rather then reduce tire pressure or add weight, they jump to buying new springs. Aftermarket springs (Deaver and Icon, at least) have more leafs, which translates to better handling over the range of conditions you encounter, of course at added cost (hence why Ford doesn't do it). Having ridden in several trucks with upgraded springs (two of which I have comparison videos on) I personally think the difference is marginal - not nearly as much as people will claim, and generally not worth the price (IMO, true of many upgrades you find people buying here).

    WITH THAT SAID, there are situations where new leafs make sense, one of which is when you are frequently carrying heavy loads offroad. In this case, Deaver (and I think ICON) offer HD springs, which allows for you to carry more weight while also improving ride quality for those conditions (with the drawback unloaded ride will suffer). So for people like you that plan to overland, springs may make sense to help with sag and general compliance with a loaded bed over rough terrain.

    As for bump stops, once the shock passes through its full range of travel it hits your stops, which from factory, are just rubber blocks. This means when you've hit an obstacle too fast and max out your suspension, the bump stops serve as a direct transmitter of the remaining force to your frame, causing your truck to buck and even break (the 2010-2011 would have frames bend in extreme cases). Not ideal.

    For those who continually push the limits of their suspension, or just in situations where something crops up unexpectedly, aftermarket bump stops serve sort of as a secondary shock, helping dissipate the force transferred to the frame. They are considered a fundamental upgrade for Gen 1 trucks, and have carried over to the Gen 2 for that reason. I do think they serve a good purpose in Gen 1 trucks, from research anyway (never ridden in a stock Gen 1), but I have noticed very little difference on Gen 2 trucks. I'm sure many others will claim otherwise.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
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  4. Peterb

    Peterb Full Access Member

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    fwiw I just got king shocks deavers and hydraulic bump stops,
    I don’t drive that hard but I was off road and I thought I would look at the bump to see if I was using it, I was surprised to see by the line of dust on the shaft I was deep into the bump stop, anyway I thought I didn’t need them but now I’m glad I’ve got them
     
  5. rtmozingo

    rtmozingo Full Access Member

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    It is a good point so I should clarify what I mean above: during normal high speed offroading, you most likely will routinely go through the full amount of travel in the front, and occasionally the rear. This is normal, acceptable, and generally not harmful to the truck. However, this is a good indicator that you are approaching the speed limit for that obstacle, and need to back off. The stock shocks have a built in bump-stop zone which greatly increases resistance towards bottoming out at the end of the travel. So, those running bump stops will find their bump stop engaged, because the aftermarket bump stop starts significantly before the actual bump zone of your suspension. Unless your bump stop was [nearly] fully compressed, you probably wouldn't have hit the stock bump stop. Of course, the bump stop engaging earlier allows it to act as a secondary shock, aiding your stock bypass in doing its job.

    Best way to tell if you've bottomed out is by sound - you'll hear the thunk out of the rears.

    example 1:

    example 2
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2019
  6. Loufish

    Loufish Full Access Member

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    My 2 cents....

    Another reason to replace the rear springs is to be able to remove the 2" rear blocks....my first off road ride was full of rear axle wrap up when on the gas...very annoying and not good for the truck. 4wd improved the issue because now the front end is pulling with the rear...But I still run in 2wd, and even in 4wd there was still more wrap then there should be...

    Bump Stops....Rtmozingo is correct that the factory shocks have an internal "bump zone" (which is one of the things that make the Raptor stand out in suspension from other trucks) but if you are going to use most of your suspension travel Pneumatic bumps work with the shock to help slow down the bottoming, which should also make for a better ride during landings and hard hits...

    The bumps need to be properly tuned with the nitrogen pressure, mine came with way too much and came in too stiff (150 psi) and I dropped that in half which really changed how hard they hit when they come in now...My last outing the bottomed a bit too often, so I'm going to add 10 psi.

    Our shocks are tuned with a compromise between street and off road, so some guys replace them altogether, but I have to say my rear shocks seem to work togather so well with the new springs & bumps I'm not going to spend my money on expensive replacements...
     
  7. Ray Knight

    Ray Knight Full Access Member

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    I owned both. The 2017 ride was much softer and smoother. The 2019 was more fun and felt in better control. I preferred the 2019 suspension. Its stiffer but in a good way.
     
  8. Peterb

    Peterb Full Access Member

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    fwiw #2 when I had deavers put in I really didn’t notice much difference, maybe I’m just a bit numb!
    They are more expensive and significantly heavier from Mr Ford’s perspective so it’s an understandable compromise
    2” blocks just seem like a horrible idea
     

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