2015 Ford F150 (and 2016 Ford F150 Raptor SVT)

sabumaru

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It all comes down to retooling the factory for the new production changes and then once they work on replenishing the demand the Raptor will return.







Found this hopeful tweet from the Ford Truck Communications guy:

Mike Levine ‏@mrlevine 12 Jan

2015 Ford F-150: the worlds best-selling truck goes aluminum to be lighter, faster, and stronger 2015 Ford F-150 - SUV - CNET Reviews via @CNET

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Austin Rutherford ‏@ausrutherford 12 Jan

@mrlevine easy, the big question… wheres the Raptor? ;)

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Mike Levine ‏@mrlevine 12 Jan

@ausrutherford We'll have news to share about Raptor later on.
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Lets hope its news,

Verstuurd vanaf mijn GT-P3110 met Tapatalk
 
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MagicMtnDan

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The news will be that the Raptor is returning based on the alll-new aluminum-ized 2015 F150

But we already know that.

What we don't yet know are the details (motor(s), options and appearance).
 
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MagicMtnDan

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Ford-F-150-headlight-2015.jpg&ExactW=298

Image By: Ford Motor Co.

The all-LED headlight on the 2015 Ford F-150 includes an acrylic light pipe around the lamp, which sets off the all-plastic system.


"DETROIT — Plastics are about to give Ford Motor Co.'s iconic F-150 truck a distinct design signature.

The all-LED headlight includes an acrylic light pipe around the lamp, which sets off the all-plastic system and makes the F-150 look like no other truck on the market, even in the dark.

"It is a new design language," said Gordon Platto, chief designer of the F-150, in an interview following the truck's introduction at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit Jan. 13. "It gives a unique character to the truck's front end, especially at night."

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford's 2015 model year F-150 is a major launch for the company. The truck has consistently ranked not only as the top selling truck in North America, but the best selling vehicle overall for 32 years, said Chief Operating Officer Mark Fields.

The automaker is using the new truck as a technology leader, including the extensive use of aluminum throughout the body to reduce weight and improve fuel consumption. The new F-150 will be 700 pounds lighter than the existing model.

That rethinking of the truck for aluminum also opened the potential for new thoughts elsewhere in the vehicle, Platto said.

"The canvas was pretty open," he said.

The last time the F-150 was updated, LED headlights were not quite ready for the mainstream market. Since then, they have been adapted on multiple platforms, while the auto industry has likewise taken to using light pipes as a new kind of way to add specific design elements.

German automaker Audi, for instance, has become recognizable by the "eyebrow" shape LED decorative lighting in the headlamps on its vehicles.

"Nobody had really done it on a truck," Platto said, "so we were able to set the precedent for it, especially for Ford."

Ford began by developing a large headlamp package. Originally, the company had planned to use glass for the optics to focus the beam, but it could not achieve the needed clarity, so instead turned to polycarbonate, he said.

Each lamp uses one LED for the high beam, a second one for the low beam and one for the light pipe. The two beams, along with the light pipe, are then housed within one module.

The orange light pipe — with the color required by federal safety standards — also doubles as the turn single, which will also help the F-150 stand out from a crowd of other trucks on the market.

Ford has used turn signals for a design feature in past vehicles, most notably the sequential lighting for the rear turn signal on a Mustang. Platto said the turn signal on the new F-150 should be just as easy to spot.

The rear lighting has the same distinctive lighting design, although it uses a series of smaller LEDs rather than a light pipe for the turn signal.

The rear lamp assembly also houses the radar system for a blind spot monitoring system — the first time Ford has offered blind spot monitoring on a truck.

Typically monitors have not been offered on a truck, in part, because they cannot be packaged inside a metal component, and most truck rear ends are part of the structural steel.

"So where are we going to put this thing?" Platto said. "It's a great piece of technology, but where do you put it? It's easy on a car when you have plastic fascias, because you can pop it anywhere and it can function."

Ford did not want to put it on the end of the steel bumper and then surround it with a plastic end cap, so the taillight module became the perfect spot.
"It provided us with a great opportunity in the lamp, and it gives us a good overall look without adding parts," he said.

The new F-150 comes out later this year, and Ford expects the new signature lighting will be sure it gets attention.

"We thought to ourselves that this was going to be a signature design element, so we were pretty excited — especially when we saw it for the first time in a dark environment.

"It's really a signature piece.""
 

Reptar

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Cutting the Raptor doesn't make sense with the amount units being ordered/sold. I ordered mine on 11/12/13 and will get a production date by the end of the month. Ford... just stuff the GT 500 engine under the hood and lets move forward.

The GT500 engine that doesn't exist in 2015 either? lol
 

Macman

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The problem with an all LED headlight is that it won't give off any heat in the winter to melt ice/snow, wonder what the solution is for that issue.
 

BAJASVT

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Bane - I saw the photos of the red Lariat/FX4 that you posted a few days ago. My initial focus was on the truck and I think it looks good, but then I noticed the snow and the dirt bikes. Not sure who's riding their dirt bikes in snow... I certainly don't.
 

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BAJASVT

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The problem with an all LED headlight is that it won't give off any heat in the winter to melt ice/snow, wonder what the solution is for that issue.

I have a 2013 Mustang with OEM HID headlights and OEM LED driving lights in the grille. I've never noticed any difference in the amount of ice/snow accumulation on them.
 

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Ford-F-150-headlight-2015.jpg&ExactW=298

Image By: Ford Motor Co.

The all-LED headlight on the 2015 Ford F-150 includes an acrylic light pipe around the lamp, which sets off the all-plastic system.


"DETROIT — Plastics are about to give Ford Motor Co.'s iconic F-150 truck a distinct design signature.

The all-LED headlight includes an acrylic light pipe around the lamp, which sets off the all-plastic system and makes the F-150 look like no other truck on the market, even in the dark.

"It is a new design language," said Gordon Platto, chief designer of the F-150, in an interview following the truck's introduction at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit Jan. 13. "It gives a unique character to the truck's front end, especially at night."

Dearborn, Mich.-based Ford's 2015 model year F-150 is a major launch for the company. The truck has consistently ranked not only as the top selling truck in North America, but the best selling vehicle overall for 32 years, said Chief Operating Officer Mark Fields.

The automaker is using the new truck as a technology leader, including the extensive use of aluminum throughout the body to reduce weight and improve fuel consumption. The new F-150 will be 700 pounds lighter than the existing model.

That rethinking of the truck for aluminum also opened the potential for new thoughts elsewhere in the vehicle, Platto said.

"The canvas was pretty open," he said.

The last time the F-150 was updated, LED headlights were not quite ready for the mainstream market. Since then, they have been adapted on multiple platforms, while the auto industry has likewise taken to using light pipes as a new kind of way to add specific design elements.

German automaker Audi, for instance, has become recognizable by the "eyebrow" shape LED decorative lighting in the headlamps on its vehicles.

"Nobody had really done it on a truck," Platto said, "so we were able to set the precedent for it, especially for Ford."

Ford began by developing a large headlamp package. Originally, the company had planned to use glass for the optics to focus the beam, but it could not achieve the needed clarity, so instead turned to polycarbonate, he said.

Each lamp uses one LED for the high beam, a second one for the low beam and one for the light pipe. The two beams, along with the light pipe, are then housed within one module.

The orange light pipe — with the color required by federal safety standards — also doubles as the turn single, which will also help the F-150 stand out from a crowd of other trucks on the market.

Ford has used turn signals for a design feature in past vehicles, most notably the sequential lighting for the rear turn signal on a Mustang. Platto said the turn signal on the new F-150 should be just as easy to spot.

The rear lighting has the same distinctive lighting design, although it uses a series of smaller LEDs rather than a light pipe for the turn signal.

The rear lamp assembly also houses the radar system for a blind spot monitoring system — the first time Ford has offered blind spot monitoring on a truck.

Typically monitors have not been offered on a truck, in part, because they cannot be packaged inside a metal component, and most truck rear ends are part of the structural steel.

"So where are we going to put this thing?" Platto said. "It's a great piece of technology, but where do you put it? It's easy on a car when you have plastic fascias, because you can pop it anywhere and it can function."

Ford did not want to put it on the end of the steel bumper and then surround it with a plastic end cap, so the taillight module became the perfect spot.
"It provided us with a great opportunity in the lamp, and it gives us a good overall look without adding parts," he said.

The new F-150 comes out later this year, and Ford expects the new signature lighting will be sure it gets attention.

"We thought to ourselves that this was going to be a signature design element, so we were pretty excited — especially when we saw it for the first time in a dark environment.

"It's really a signature piece.""

Love the headlights. But it sounds like those taillights are going to be a pretty penny to replace and will be bad for guys wanting to run aftermarket lamps. And for the love of God, I hope they don't emit a K-band that is picked up my radar detectors...BMW, Audi, and Porsche make my Valentine 1 go crazy enough as is.
 

Macman

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Heated Headlights!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Whoo Hoo!!!!:wtf2:

HID's and halogens give off heat, which melts ice/snow off the headlights after prolonged use. LEDs do not, so potentially if you don't clean the snow or ice off fully it will not melt through.
 
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